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Gorgeous Photos Of Victorian Ladies in Evening Gowns From the 1850s

The clothes were an expression of class and symbol of wealth, during the Victorian era. Upper-class women wore a tightly laced corset over a bodice or chemisette and paired them with a skirt adorned with numerous embroideries and trims. Middle-class women exhibited similar dress styles; however, the decorations were not as extravagant.

The Evening Gown was also very popular among the Victorian ladies. An even gown is s a long flowing dress usually worn on formal occasions. Its origin dates back to the early 15th century. with the rise of the Burgundian court and its fashionable and fashion-conscious ruler Philip the Good.

During the Victorian era, the Evening gown consisted of a fitted bodice with an open neckline, the shoulder-line is on the shoulder, with sleeves ranging from extravagant puffs to small or even almost non-existent ruffles or lace. Fabrics ranged from rich brocades and velvets to lightweight chiffons and organdies.

Here below are some beautiful pictures of Victorian ladies wearing evening Gowns from the 1850s.

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Written by Alicia Linn

Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet....... I’ve never been able to figure out what would i write about myself.

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4 Comments

  1. I’m unsure what I would call these gowns. They look like casual wear. Evening gowns had more detail, and the dress code for the evening was white or off white. The decoletée would have been made of muslin or something similar even at Victorian hypocrisy. They’re crinolines with day jackets and shawls