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Romanticism to Realism: Stunning Paintings of Christian Krohg from the late 19th and Early 20th Century

Christian Krohg was a genius Norwegian painter, artist, illustrator and author. He was born in Oslo on August 13th, 1852. He was one of five children born to Georg Anton Krohg and Sophie Amalia Holst. His grandfather was a prominent politician. His father was both a civil servant and a writer. His family was multi-talented. He never let a day go by without accomplishing something.

Krohg’s mother passed away in 1861. His aunt took care of the household. Krohg was sent to the Hartvig Nissen School. His father had one demand: his son must study Law and become a lawyer. Krohg followed his father’s wishes. However, he had other ideas. His dream was to become a painter. He wanted a life in which he could express himself.

Krohg followed his ambitions after becoming a lawyer. He studied art and traveled to Europe. He painted and wrote news articles and stories. He was, in some ways, like Ernest Hemingway. He painted the things he knew and what he experienced. Krohg brought art from Romanticism to Realism. His paintings depicted the lives of men and women at that time in their day-to-day activities.

#1 The Struggle for Existence’ Christian Krohg, 1890.

The Struggle for Existence’ Christian Krohg, 1890.

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#2 Self-Portrait, 1883.

Self-Portrait, 1883.

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#3 Village Street in Normandy, 1892.

Village Street in Normandy, 1892.

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#4 Helm a-Lee!, 1882.

Helm a-Lee!, 1882.

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#5 Furling Sail, 1900.

Furling Sail, 1900.

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#6 A Farewell, 1876.

A Farewell, 1876.

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#7 Portrait of Ane Gaihede, 1888.

Portrait of Ane Gaihede, 1888.

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#8 Albertine, 1917.

Albertine, 1917.

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#9 Mother at her Child’s Bed, 1884.

Mother at her Child’s Bed, 1884.

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#10 The Net-Mender, 1880.

The Net-Mender, 1880.

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#11 Seamstress’ Christmas Eve, 1893.

Seamstress’ Christmas Eve, 1893.

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#12 A Little Boy, 1890.

A Little Boy, 1890.

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#13 Braiding Her hair, 1888.

Braiding Her hair, 1888.

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#14 Farm Interior, 1900.

Farm Interior, 1900.

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#15 Sick Girl, 1880-81.

Sick Girl, 1880-81.

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#16 After the “Løkken”, 1889.

After the “Løkken”, 1889.

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#17 The Green Room, 1920.

The Green Room, 1920.

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#18 Young Lady, 1890.

Young Lady, 1890.

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#19 Errand Boy Drinking Coffee, 1885.

Errand Boy Drinking Coffee, 1885.

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#20 Charles Lundh in Conversation with Christian Krohg, 1883.

Charles Lundh in Conversation with Christian Krohg, 1883.

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#21 Tired, 1885.

Tired, 1885.

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#22 A French Sailor, 1897.

A French Sailor, 1897.

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#23 North Wind, 1887.

North Wind, 1887.

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#24 Difficult Waters, 1890.

Difficult Waters, 1890.

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#25 The Shoal, 1898.

The Shoal, 1898.

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Written by Jacob Aberto

Sincere, friendly, curious, ambitious, enthusiast. I'm a content crafter and social media expert. I love Classic Movies because their dialogue, scenery and stories are awesome.

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